They may be old, but they're ready to run

Vintage sleds are the focus at Feb. 2 snowmobile ride, show

Waiting to head out on the 2017 Old Timers Run, riders and sleds mingled outside the Lake Park Liquor Store during the early hours of the morning. (Tribune file photo)

Waiting to head out on the 2017 Old Timers Run, riders and sleds mingled outside the Lake Park Liquor Store during the early hours of the morning. (Tribune file photo)

Vintage sleds of every shape, size and color can be found gathering at the Lake Park Liquor Store parking lot every year on the first Saturday in February. This year's Midnite Riders Classic Old Timers Run is set for Saturday, Feb. 2. (Submitted photo)

Vintage sleds of every shape, size and color can be found gathering at the Lake Park Liquor Store parking lot every year on the first Saturday in February. This year's Midnite Riders Classic Old Timers Run is set for Saturday, Feb. 2. (Submitted photo)

Lined up and ready to ride, the snowmobilers waited their turn to ride up Nylander Hill during the 2017 Old timer's Run. (Tribune file photo)

Lined up and ready to ride, the snowmobilers waited their turn to ride up Nylander Hill during the 2017 Old timer's Run. (Tribune file photo)

Every year, vintage snowmobile enthusiasts congregate in Lake Park on the first Saturday in February for the Midnite Riders Classic Old Timers Run and Snowmobile Show. This year's event is coming up next Saturday, Feb. 2.

Hosted by the Midnite Riders Snowmobile Club, the run has been a tradition among lakes area snowmobiling enthusiasts since the early 1990s.

According to organizer Bill Livdahl, riders begin gathering outside the Lake Park Liquor Store at about 8 a.m. on the morning of the event, though the run itself doesn't start until 10:30 a.m. That's because the judging for the vintage sleds — 25 years or older — gets underway bright and early, with trophies being awarded at 10 a.m. Prizes are awarded to the best-looking and most creatively-decorated sleds in several categories.

Looking up at the steep slope of Nylander Hill, the riders at the 2017 Old Timer's Run dared one anther to test their skills and their sleds on the run to the top. Event organizer Bill Livdahl says one of the main challenges is keeping the older sleds running during the 39-mile run. (Tribune file photo)

Looking up at the steep slope of Nylander Hill, the riders at the 2017 Old Timer's Run dared one anther to test their skills and their sleds on the run to the top. Event organizer Bill Livdahl says one of the main challenges is keeping the older sleds running during the 39-mile run. (Tribune file photo)

"The judging is only for the vintage sleds," said Livdahl, though the run itself is open to snowmobiles both old and new.

"It's got to be a snowmobile, but they can be old ones, new ones, modified, homemade, restored, original — anything they can get running, basically," he joked. On a more serious note, however, no ATVs, dirt bikes or four-wheelers are allowed on the Midnite Riders' trails, as they receive state Grant-in-Aid funding to help keep them groomed and in good condition throughout the snowmobiling season.

Even with good trail conditions, keeping the sleds running over the course of the 39-mile Old Timers Run can be a real challenge, Livdahl said. 

For full article, go to: DLOnline

Source, image(s), credits & more: DLOnline | Vicki Gerdes