Four wren species love Minnesota in the summertime

It won't be long and spring will be upon us once again, although one would have to wonder if this spring will be late in arriving. The snow is deep, the ice on the lakes is thick, and winter still has a month to go yet.

A sedge wren perches on wildflowers at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt/USFWS Midwest Region

A sedge wren perches on wildflowers at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt/USFWS Midwest Region

Regardless of when Old Man Winter actually leaves the northland, most of us look forward to springtime. And it won't be long until migrant birds will begin trickling northward and eventually arrive here in northern Minnesota.

A group of birds that I especially enjoy are the handful of wren species that Minnesota harbors. For of the nine species found throughout North America, four species of wrens call Minnesota their summer home. And all four are quite different from one another in both preferred habitat and lifestyle, yet all share similar physical and behavioral features.

Most wrens nest in cavities, and as one particular wren's name implies, the house wren is one such wren. Many a bluebird house placed on a post near a woodlot or orchard doesn't escape the notice of a courting male house wren.

In fact, various other objects become nest sites as well. Old shoes or boots, open containers, and even hornet nests have all served as this wren's "house."

Male house wrens arrive in the springtime ahead of the females in order to establish breeding territories. A tireless songster, the male house wren sings its combo of trills and rattles with exuberance. 

For full article, go to: DLOnline

Source, image(s), credits & more: DLOnline | Blane Klemek