Looking for ways to enjoy the outdoors?

Here are 7 things to do this spring

A male sharp-tailed grouse puts on a dancing display in this undated photo from the North Dakota prairie. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' area wildlife office in Baudette offers two blinds for viewing dancing sharptails in the spring. Courtesy of North Dakota Game and Fish Department

A male sharp-tailed grouse puts on a dancing display in this undated photo from the North Dakota prairie. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' area wildlife office in Baudette offers two blinds for viewing dancing sharptails in the spring. Courtesy of North Dakota Game and Fish Department

There is light at the end of the tunnel — at last — and it’s time to start thinking about getting outside for some springtime fun.

Options are numerous; maybe it’s as simple as a hike in the park. Or something more adventurous, such as a trip to a popular — and often crowded — border river in pursuit of walleyes or sturgeon.

The wildlife-watching possibilities are nearly endless. Snow geese, dancing grouse, birds of all kinds frantically get about the business of replicating the species. For humans, spring is a time to make up for all of those days cooped up indoors during a winter that was too cold, too snowy and much too long. And even for those who aren’t yet sick of ice fishing, there’ll be opportunities to punch a hole and wet a line for a few more weeks in places such as Devils Lake and Lake of the Woods. But the temperature will be closer to 40 above than 40 below, and that’s never a bad thing.

With that in mind, here are a few ideas for getting outside and enjoying the great outdoors this spring.

Booming grounds

The prairie chicken booming grounds at Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge and adjacent lands in Polk County are a perennially popular springtime attraction for photographers and wildlife watchers. Male prairie chickens gather en masse on their leks, or booming grounds, in hopes of attracting a mate. They produce the booming sound by inflating air sacs in their necks as the centerpiece of their mating ritual.

Prairie chickens starting their booming display at first light so visitors should be set up in the blinds before daylight. It’s worth getting up early to witness the spectacle.

The Crookston Chamber and Visitors Bureau handles reservations for the blinds at Glacial Ridge and provides maps for reaching the sites. For more information, contact the Crookston CVB at (218) 281-4320.

The Minnesota Prairie Chicken Society also lists several destinations for watching chickens boom in the spring. More info: www.prairiechickens.org

For full article, go to: Brainerd Dispatch

Source, image(s), credits & more: Brainerd Dispatch | Brad Dokken / Forum News Service