Aquatic, terrestrial invasives were COLA topics

Local environmental specialists discussed invasive species — both aquatic and terrestrial — with the Hubbard County Coalition of Lake Associations on March 28.

 
Wild parsnip is a menace to humans, habitat and livestock. Its toxic sap causes severe blistering. (Photo by Minnesota Department of Agriculture)

Wild parsnip is a menace to humans, habitat and livestock. Its toxic sap causes severe blistering. (Photo by Minnesota Department of Agriculture)

 

William Lee, a Hubbard County Soil and Water Conservation District water quality resources specialist, spoke about newly arrived terrestrial invasive species and noxious weeds.

"It's important to keep our eye out for the newly arrived species because we know about the ones we have, but if you see one of these new ones, it's very important to report it," Lee said.

Greg Hensel is the agricultural inspector for Hubbard County. Sightings should be reported to him at 237-1456.

"Early detection and reporting is key," Lee said.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a complete list of terrestrial invasive plants on its website.

One of the biggest nuisances and concerns is buckthorn, he said. Both the common and glossy varieties are noxious weeds originating from Europe. They can grow up to 20 feet high in thick stands.

Heartland Park has a thriving population of buckthorn, Lee said, along with lowland areas near the Fishhook River in town and south of town.

"It can grow just about anywhere," he said.